Local Churches


St James The Great, Blakedown St James The Great, Churchill St Peters, Broome




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Church Services for May 2010

Sunday 2nd May – Easter 5
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am- Informal Service-Blakedown
11.15am-Morning Prayer-Churchill
4pm-Parents and Children Together-Blakedown

Sunday 9th May – Easter 6
10am – Benefice (combined churches) Eucharist - Blakedown

Thursday 13th May – Ascension Day
7pm – Holy Eucharist - Blakedown

Sunday 16th May- Sunday after Ascension Day (Easter 7)
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Morning Prayer – Blakedown
11.15am – Holy Eucharist – Churchill

Saturday 22nd May- 12.30pm - Holy Matrimony - Blakedown

Sunday 23rd May – PENTECOST
10am – Benefice (combined churches) Eucharist – Broome

Sunday 30th May – TRINITY SUNDAY
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome (the Rev’d Jim Samuel)
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown (the Rev’d Pat Barford)
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill

Sunday 6th June – Trinity 1
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Informal Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – Parents and Children Together – Blakedown


On Sunday 13th June there will be a combined churches Eucharist at Blakedown celebrated by Bishop John of Worcester.
Holy Eucharist – every Wednesday at 10am in Broome church
Social Morning and Bible reflection-2nd and 4th Wednesdays at 11.15am
in Blakedown church.



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Church Services for April 2010


Thursday 1st April – MAUNDY THURSDAY
7pm – Maundy Eucharist - Blakedown

Friday 2nd April – GOOD FRIDAY
10am – Good Friday Service – Broome
3pm- Good Friday Meditation-Churchill

Sunday 4th April – EASTER DAY
6am-Stourbridge Deanery SUNRISE SERVICE
at the Four Stones on the Clent Hills
(also at 5.30am in St James, Woollaston for those unable to climb the hill)
Breakfast to follow!
8am – Holy Eucharist – Churchill
9am-Holy Eucharist- Broome
10am-Holy Eucharist-Blakedown
11.15am- Holy Eucharist by Extension-Churchill
4pm-Parents and Children Together-Blakedown

Sunday 11th April – Second Sunday of Easter
11.15am – Benefice Eucharist – Churchill
1pm-Holy Baptism-Blakedown

Sunday 18th April – Third Sunday of Easter
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am- Holy Eucharist-Blakedown
11.15am-Morning Prayer-Churchill

Sunday 25th April-Fourth Sunday of Easter
10am – Benefice Eucharist-Broome
12.30pm-Holy Baptism-Blakedown
Sunday 2nd May - Fifth Sunday of Easter
9am-Holy Eucharist-Broome
10am-Informal Service-Blakedown
11.15am-Morning Prayer-Churchill
4pm-Parents and Children Together-Blakedown
Holy Eucharist – every Wednesday at 10am in Broome church
Social Morning and Bible reflection-2nd and 4th Wednesdays at 11.15am in Blakedown church.

                                 _______SERVICES_______

(PLEASE NOTE THERE ARE SOME CHANGES TO THE SERVICE PATTERN THIS MONTH
TO ALLOW FOR THE CHURCHILL AND BLAKEDOWN ANNUAL CHURCH MEETING.)

Sunday 7th March – Lent 3
8am – Holy Eucharist – Churchill
9am – Holy Eucharist - Broome
10am – Morning Prayer – Blakedown
(followed by the presentation of church accounts to the PCC at 11.15am)
4pm – Parents and Children Together - Blakedown

Sunday 14th March – MOTHERING SUNDAY – Lent 4
11.15am – Benefice Eucharist – Blakedown

Sunday 21st March – Lent 5
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am Holy Eucharist– Churchill
(followed by the Churchill and Blakedown ANNUAL PAROCHIAL CHURCH COUNCIL MEETING
at 11.15am at Churchill & a ‘Bring and Share’ lunch in the village hall.)
Sunday 28th March – PALM SUNDAY
10am – Benefice Eucharist and Palm Procession around the church - Broome

Services for Holy Week and Easter:
Monday / Tuesday and Wednesday of Holy Week
9am – Morning Prayer (said) - Blakedown

1st April – Maundy Thursday
9am – Blakedown School in church followed by Hot Cross Buns and refreshments in the school hall. All welcome!
7pm – Maundy Eucharist – Blakedown

2nd April – Good Friday
10am – Good Friday Service – Broome
3pm – Good Friday Meditation – Churchill
7.30pm – Ecumenical Service – Hagley Free Church

Sunday 4th April – EASTER DAY
8am – Holy Eucharist – Churchill
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown
11.15am – Holy Eucharist by Extension – Churchill
4pm – Parents and Children Together – Blakedown






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Sunday 6th December – Advent 2
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Informal Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – SERVICE OF LIGHTS – Churchill

Saturday 12th December -
1.30pm – Holy Matrimony - Churchill


Sunday 13th December – Advent 3

11.15am – Benefice Eucharist – Churchill

Thursday 17th December –
7pm – CAROL SERVICE – Blakedown


Sunday 20th December – Advent 4
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill


Thursday 24th December – CHRISTMASS EVE
4pm – Crib Service especially for children – Blakedown
11.30pm – MIDNIGHT COMMUNION by extension – Broome
11.30pm – MIDNIGHT EUCHARIST – Blakedown

Friday 25th December – CHRISTMASS DAY
8am – Holy Eucharist – Churchill
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill

Sunday 27th December – Christmass 1.
10am – Benefice Eucharist - Broome


Friday 1st January – NEW YEAR’S DAY
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown


Sunday 3rd January -
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome

10am – Informal service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm - Parents and Children Together – Blakedown
5pm – COMBINED CHURCHES NEW YEAR SERVICE – St Saviour’s, HAGLEY.

Sunday 10th January –
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Blakedown

Sunday 17th January –
9am – Holy Eucharist by extension – Broome
10am – Morning Prayer – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill

Sunday 24th January –
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Broome

Sunday 30th January –
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – CHRISTINGLE SERVICE – Blakedown

Holy Eucharist – 10am every Wednesday at Broome

Bible reflection and social morning – 11.15am – 2nd and 4th Wednesdays in the month - Blakedown

<

The view from the Rectory….

Dear friends,

Christmass is coming, and the geese are getting fat….’, ‘Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way….’.
Yes, it’s preparation time for Christmass, yet again.

It is really twelve months since the last time? Already people have that anxious look – ‘so much to do and so little time’.
Is this what Christmass is really all about? This time of goodwill, we are told, will lead to even more work in the New Year
for those whose job it is to pick up the pieces of the lives of some people; the Samaritans, Relate, perhaps even the local clergy, and many others.
It is at Christmass, more than at any other time, when the crises in family life seem to come to a head.
Yet, it doesn’t have to be like this. If only everyone at Christmass could catch the vision of one Brian Wren
one of the modern hymn writers. He expressed himself in these words:

There’s a spirit in the air,
telling Christians everywhere:
Praise the love that Christ revealed,
living, working, in our world’.

Try not to let the material things overwhelm you. The first task is preparing to celebrate the birth of Jesus,
welcoming him into our hearts, and seeing him in one another.

Traditionally, the Sunday before Advent (this year 22nd November ) is called ‘Stir-up Sunday’, when the words of the
special prayer said in churches on that day (the Collect) serve as a reminder to get stirring with the Christmass pudding,
if you have not already done so!

Of course, there is more to ‘Stir-up Sunday’ than that. The Sunday may have passed by the time you read this letter,
but if you are reading it before Christmass, perhaps here is a good place on which to begin your preparations:
‘Stir up, O Lord, the wills of your faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works,
may by you be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.’

With our will stirred up, we can be sure of a truly Happy Christmass; and that is what the Benefice Readers Gerry and Graham
and I wish for you, and Hilary, Christine and Diane our wives also send you their best wishes for the Christmass time.

Season’s greetings and every blessing,

Fr Paul.
P.S. The view from the cat-flap….

Anna the Rectory cat has asked me to jot down a New Year thought from her to you!
She cannot read or write as far as I know, but , in her long life which may now be coming to its close,
she has had plenty of time to meditate on the nature of things. So she feels she has, what may be her last thoughts to meow to us…..
If my translation is correct she says:

As you humans look into the new year and look into your future, could you take time, like us cats,
to savour the moment you are in and those among whom you live and have your being now?
Remember too those for whom time hangs long and heavily. We cats notice this among you humans you always rush
about and sometimes forget those who aren’t so able these days. In all this take time to share these moments and
people thankfully with God, who blesses you and us cats ( and I suppose dogs and other living creatures….) with every blessing.

Purr and love, Anna.

Not terribly profound, but she is only a little cat! P.

<

_______SERVICES_______
Church Services for October
Friday 2nd October –
2.15pm – School Harvest service - Blakedown
6.30pm – Benefice Harvest Service – Churchill
Sunday 4th October – HARVEST SUNDAY
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – PACT - Blakedown
Every Wednesday 10am – Holy Communion – Broome
2nd and 4th Wednesdays in the month – Bible Study – Blakedown
Sunday 11th October – Trinity 18

11.15am – Benefice Eucharist – Churchill
Sunday 18th October – St Luke
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Morning Prayer – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer & Communion – Churchill
6pm – Benefice Healing Ministry Service – Blakedown (with St Saviour’s & St John’s Hagley)
Saturday 24th October –
3pm – Holy Matrimony - Blakedown
Sunday 25th October – Bible Sunday
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Broome
6.30pm – One World Week Service – Clent
Sunday 1st November – ALL SAINTS’ DAY
9am- Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Informal Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – Parents and Children Together – Blakedown
Monday 2nd November – ALL SOULS’ DAY
7pm – Requiem Eucharist (to remember loved ones departed) – Blakedown

Informal Bible Study 2nd and 4th Wednesdays in the month at 11.15am - Blakedown

Holy Eucharist every Wednesday at 10am in Broome church
From the Registers for June 2009
Holy Baptisms:
12th July – Melissa Joelle Farnham
Joseph Richard Hancock
Charlotte Rebecca Hancock (Blakedown)
13th September – Matthew Thomas Stockley-von-Statzer (Churchill)
We welcome you into the Lord’s Family
Holy Matrimony:
4th July – Jerome Ellis Price & Carley Jayne Edwards (Blakedown)
24th July – Dominic Justin Roberts & Sarah Louise Frost (Broome)
26th July – Michael James Dawes & Natalie Elizabeth Barnard (Blakedown)
1st August – Matthew Allen & Emma Hicks (Hagley)
1st August – Michael James & Michelle Withers (Hagley)
6th August – Matt Beckerleg & Laura Cooley (Hagley)
15th August - Gary Hastie & Joanne Mitchell (Broome)
Funerals:
25th July – Burial of Ashes – Anthony (Tony) Eden R.I.P. (Blakedown)
13th August – Cremation – Gerald Twaite R.I.P. (Blakedown)
20th August – Church and Burial – Robert (Bob) Yardley R.I.P. (Belbroughton)
24th August – Church and Burial – Anthony (Tony) Thomas R.I.P. (Blakedown
)
‘Rest eternal grant unto them, O Lord’
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Church Services for August and September

Sunday 2nd August – Trinity 8
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – Parents and Children Together (PACT) at the Rectory
(if raining at Blakedown church)

Sunday 9th August – Trinity 9
11.15am – Benefice Eucharist – Churchill
Sunday 16th August – Trinity 10
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill

Sunday 23rd August – Trinity 11
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Broome
(possibly a united service with members of the congregation of
St Leonard’s church, Clent)

Sunday 30th August – Trinity 12
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome (Guest celebrant – the Rev’d Barbara Mapley)
10am – Morning Prayer – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill

Sunday 6th September – Trinity 13
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome (Guest celebrant – the Rev’d Stephen Winter)
10am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – PACT – Blakedown

Sunday 13th September – Trinity 14
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Blakedown
Sunday 20th September – Trinity 15
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Morning Prayer – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer and Communion – Churchill

Sunday 27th September – Trinity 16
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Broome
Sunday 4th October – HARVEST SUNDAY
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – PACT - Blakedown

Every Wednesday 10am – Holy Communion – Broome
2nd and 4th Wednesdays in the month – Bible Study – Blakedown

Speaking Personally….the view from the Rectory.


Dear Parishioners,
Many of you have kindly been enquiring how Diane and I got on when we went on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela during May.
I hope you don’t mind me taking this opportunity to write a little about it.
Before sharing our experiences it’s probably worth explaining a bit why there is a pilgrimage to Santiago.
Santiago is named after St James (Saint –Iago) who is the patron Saint of Spain (and indeed of many St James’ churches not least the ones at
Churchill and Blakedown). (The day the Church remembers St James is on the 25th July each year.)
The legend has it that James the brother of John and follower of Jesus was told by Jesus to go to the furthermost Western point
of the world and share his faith. This James did, but his sharing of the Gospel was somewhat unsuccessful.
He returned to the Holy Land and was beheaded by Herod Agrippa in 44AD.
Many legends have developed to explain the appearance of St James’ bones in Spain and the development of the pilgrim routes in the Middle Ages.
The most consistent are that the followers of St James carried his body by boat to Galicia and buried him there.
Around 800 years later a hermit is said to have seen a bright star with a glowing light that fell to earth at Compostela
(possibly from ‘Campus Stellae’ – field of stars) where the bones of St James were subsequently found.
More and more pilgrims followed the way of the Santiago ‘The Way of St James’, and the original chapel soon became the
Cathedral of the new settlement Santiago de Compostela.
In fact, Santiago de Compostela became the third most holy site for Christians to visit, after the Holy Land and the Vatican.
In Medieval times the ‘Caminos’ (Ways) of Saint James became very popular. The scallop shell became an important symbol for the pilgrim.
This was because scallops are native to the shores of Galicia and so pilgrims used to eat them and their shells then had a practical use
to scoop up water and food. Secondly, because scallops are native to Galicia the shells could function as proof of completion.
By having a scallop shell, a pilgrim could almost certainly prove that he or she had taken part in a pilgrimage.
Modern day pilgrims may have shell badge to fasten to a hat or to a rucksack, or a have a shell worn as a pendant.
Evidence of having been on a recognised pilgrim route is obtained by having a ‘Pilgrim Passport’ rubber-stamped at bars, cafes,
shops or lodging places along the way.
(If you would like to see the artefacts of a Medieval pilgrim’s burial go to the crypt of Worcester Cathedral and you will see
some there including that pilgrim’s shell badge.)
Some 16 people having links with a Church organisation called the ‘Society of Mary and Martha’ based in Devon agreed to walk the
75 mile journey along the ‘Portuguese Camino’ from Tui on the Portuguese / Spanish boarder.
We walked over 6 days from town to town along the way, staying each night in a hotel.
The terrain started out (and finished) quite urban, but became a mixture of hills and rolling countryside.
We passed through some quaint villages and some spectacular scenery.
We had to walk through two days of heavy rain but the rest of our time was sunny and bright.
Along the way, we chatted and shared stories, compared blisters and had some time alone to reflect.
There were not many other pilgrims on this route as the most favoured route is the French Camino.
Some people in the villages wished us all a cheery ‘Bon Camino’ as we journeyed on.
Our walk was punctuated by the occasional stop at local bars and cafes where another stamp could be added to our ‘Pilgrim Passports’.
Each day the Camino was clearly marked by yellow arrows and shell signs which made navigation very easy.
We all enjoyed the arriving – a shower, food and a bed booked at an hotel each night (our cases being taken from hotel to hotel by courier each day).
There was also time to hobble about looking around each town and eventually meeting up at a bar for a night-cap.
The highlights of the walking were getting to know members of our pilgrim band well, having time to reflect on one’s own,
and meeting some other pilgrims on the route from other parts of the world. Santiago is a city with an ancient ‘heart’ around the
Cathedral where there are pilgrims and tourists, but also modern and bustling and cosmopolitan. On arrival in Santiago the end of the
pilgrimage is a shell shape set into the ground in the centre of the Square in front of the Cathedral.
After putting your foot on the shell to show you have completed the walk, everyone heads to the Pilgrimage Office to queue for your
‘Compostela’ or your official ratification of having completed your pilgrimage.
The next day we all attended a service in the Cathedral at noon.
It was quite a moving moment to recognise that nearly all the people there had either walked or cycled to be there
or made some other sacrifice of time or effort.
At the end of the service, we saw the amazing spectacle of a 5ft high solid silver Thurible with incense being swung
30ft into the air with 4 men pulling on a rope attached to a pulley mechanism causing the censor to swing.
The censor was swung from side to side in front of the Altar, and was an action which delighted priests and people alike and at the end
everyone cheered and clapped. Today, incense is used in churches to show the prayers of the people ascending to heaven.
In Medieval times it was simply a way of keeping the air fresh when there were many unwashed people in a church building!
I suppose a pilgrimage is about finding ones own limitations – can you walk the distance – but also personally in patience with
oneself and others, forbearance and endurance, and acknowledging that we are all limited in one way or another.
However, if we look out for each other, we can help each other on the journey and all make it to the end and to a glorious celebration.
A bit like life really and the promise of heaven!
God bless you on your journeys this holiday (holy day) time of August and September. HAPPY DAYS!
Your friend and priest,
Fr Paul.


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Saturday 4th July – noon – Holy Matrimony – Blakedown

Sunday 5th July – Trinity 4

9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome

10am – Family Service – Blakedown

11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill

3pm – Open Air Ecumenical Service at the view-point on the Clent Hills
(bring your picnic Tea). If raining the service will be in Clent church

Sunday 12th July – Trinity 5

10am – Benefice Eucharist – Blakedown

1pm – Holy Baptisms – Blakedown

11.15am –  Service at St Leonard’s, Clent (see note below)

4pm – Parents and Children Together at the Rectory
(If raining in Blakedown church)

Monday 13th July – 7pm – School Leavers’ Service – Blakedown

Tuesday 14th July – Society of Catholic Priests Eucharist – Churchill

Sunday 19th July – for St James

9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome

10am – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown

11.15am – Morning Prayer and Communion – Churchill

Friday 24th July – 3pm – Holy Matrimony – Broome

Saturday 25th July – 3pm – Burial of Ashes (Tony Eden R.I.P) – Blakedown

Sunday 26th July – Trinity 7

10am – Benefice Eucharist – Broome

1.30pm – Holy Matrimony – Blakedown

3pm – Renewal of Wedding Vows – Blakedown
Note re: Sunday 12th July:  The congregation of St Leonard’s have specifically invited members of
Broome Congregation to attend, but anyone from the Benefice may attend as well.
This will be followed by a Summer lunch. If anyone intends to go along to this service
and you have not already given your names to Diana Ingham please to so
or contact the Rev’d Barbara Mapley on tel: 01562 – 730531 for catering purposes. Thank you.

Holy Communion 10am on Wednesdays in Broome church

Bible Study 11.15am on second and fourth Wednesdays in Blakedown church.



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Holy Communion 10.00 a.m. each Wednesday at Broome
Church Services for June 2009

Sunday 7th June – Trinity Sunday
9.00 am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10.00 am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15 am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4.00 pm – Parents and Children Together – Blakedown

Sunday 14th June – Trinity 1
11.15 am – Benefice Eucharist – Churchill

Sunday 21st June – Trinity 2
9.00 am – Holy Eucharist - Broome
10.00 am – Morning Prayer & Communion – Blakedown
11.15 am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
1.00 pm – Holy Baptism - Blakedown

Sunday 28th June – St Peter’s Day
10.00 am – Patronal Festival at Broome

Sunday 5th July – Trinity 4
9.00 am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10.00 am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15 am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
3.00 pm – Open Air Service & Picnic – Clent Hills – organised by Hagley and District Churches.
(Parents and Children Together at the Rectory at 4 pm on the 12th July.)

Speaking Personally….the view from the Rectory. (8th May 2009)

Dear readers,
Christians will celebrate God’s gift of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost on 31st May. This is a time when they give thanks for the outpouring
of the gifts of the Spirit bringing light and life to the first followers of Jesus. On the Sunday following Pentecost,
Christians consider the nature of God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit on what is called Trinity Sunday.
On the Sundays after Trinity the liturgical colour for the season is green and Christians have traditionally thought of these
Sundays as times of growth in faith and influence of the Holy Spirit. Just as trees need to be lopped to let the sunlight through,
perhaps in the Summer months we need to think about what may be blocking the action of the Holy Spirit in our lives.
I realise that for many people time for worship in a church has to be
pushed aside by worldly concerns. Yes, I know the lawn need mowing and the lure of the shops, open on a
Sunday these days, is strong and the DIY and Sport call us, as well as visiting family and friends, and these are all important in their own way.
We can get easily distracted by so many things as our lives are so busy these days, BUT how much richer our lives may be
if we place God first and then all that is good and right and all our distractions can follow our Sunday prayers.
I think many people seek a deep meaning for their everyday lives.
Letting God ‘in’ is essential to real life and love. More than we can ask, or imagine, is honestly realised by our presence at worship –
even when we are unable to believe this to be so. God understands that we have all sorts of distractions and pressures but longs
for each one of us to make time to draw close to his guidance and supportive love.
This is important not just for ourselves but for all we seek to serve in our family, friendships and work places,
in a context of a world in need of those who draw close to the heart of creative love.
Sometimes we may feel disappointed with worship when we come to
church or with the response to our prayers. However, from my experience, we may rest assured that we shall be given strength,
‘The Comforter’ (another name for the Holy Spirit), to carry us through day by day, even though we may not always understand
God’s action at the time.
The early Christian way of life, as described in the Book of the Acts of
the Apostles, is startlingly dependant on and affected by the power of the Holy Spirit at work in individual lives,
creating new followers of Jesus and giving vitality to the early growth of the various Christian communities.
As God wills, may we all be open to the gifts and leading of the Holy
Spirit, whether in our personal faith journey, or in the life of our local churches and community.
Your friend and Priest,
Fr Paul.


SERVICES

“Worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness.”
CHURCH SERVICES FOR MAY 2009
Sunday 3rd May – Easter 4.
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – Parents and Children Together – Blakedown.
Sunday 10th May – Easter 5.
10am – Benefice Eucharist – Blakedown
12.45pm – Holy Baptism – Churchill
6.30pm  - Christian Aid service – St John’s Hagley
Sunday 17th May – Easter 6.
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome (Rev’d Stephen Winter)
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill (for Churchill & Blakedown)
Thursday 21st May – Ascension Day
7pm – Holy Eucharist – Blakedown (Rev’d Mike Rutter)
Sunday 24th May – Easter 7
10am -  Benefice Eucharist – Broome (Rev’d Len Burn)
Sunday 31st May – PENTECOST
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Holy Eucharist - Blakedown
11.15am -    Morning Prayer & Communion – Churchill

PM – Holy Baptism – Broome
Sunday 7th June – TRINITY
9am – Holy Eucharist – Broome
10am – Family Service – Blakedown
11.15am – Morning Prayer – Churchill
4pm – Parents and Children Together – Blakedown.
There will not be a celebration of the Eucharist on Wednesday 13th and Wednesday 20th May.

Bible Study Group meets in Blakedown Church at 11.30am on Wednesdays 13th May and 27th May

An opportunity to remember loved ones gone before us
Every Wednesday - 10.00 a.m. Holy Communion at Broome
11.00 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. - Blakedown Church open, with
Prayer & Bible Study (Refreshments) at 11.30 a.m.
All welcome
Every Wednesday - 10.00 a.m. Holy Communion at Broome
11.00 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. - Blakedown Church open
with Prayer & Bible Study (Refreshments) at 11.30 a.m.

* Parents and Children Together (PACT)….the start of a new, informal service especially aimed at parents and young children to be held in
Blakedown church on the first Sunday in each month for an initial trial period. Parents, if you would like to come to church with your young child or
children but, for any reason, find Sunday morning difficult, why not come along for an half an hour of worship and activities aimed at the younger children?
Worship will be followed by tea and biscuits.


CHURCHILL WITH BLAKEDOWN

ANNUAL VESTRY & PAROCHIAL CHURCH MEETINGS 2008

The following were elected to office:
WARDENS FOR THE PARISH
Nominated by Churchill: Mr David Phillips
Nominated by Blakedown: Mrs Mary Macdiarmid and Mrs Janice Johns
LICENSED READERS
Mr Gerald Dyer (Ex officio to the PCC).
DEANERY SYNOD
Mr Roy Keys Mrs Sue Amer Mrs Eileen Rock
PAROCHIAL CHURCH Council
Mrs Sara Brehony Mrs Hilary Dyer Mrs Mary Wyatt
Mrs Carrie Fellows Mrs Doris Hasty Mrs Pauline Hayward Mrs Marilyn Hiscock Mr David Houle Mrs Sue Mye
Mrs Joan Rand Mr Graham Rock Mrs Janette Snipe
Mr Brian Tait Mrs Gillian Tait Mr Alan Williams
Mr Keith Owen Mrs Diana Reed-Daunter Mr Paul Whitwam
Mr Clive Reed-Daunter
OFFICERS OF THE PAROCHIAL CHURCH COUNCIL
Hon. Secretary Mr Gerald Dyer
Hon. Treasurers (Blakedown) Mr Michael Edwards
(Churchill) Mr Roy Keys
Hon. Electoral Roll Officer Dr Ron Smith
Independent Examiner Mr Andrew Harding


Speaking personally….

Dear friends,

I like to watch some of the TV documentaries, especially the travel ones. I often learn some interesting fact or other. In a documentary about Thailand I heard all about how the young men there, before they settle down and marry, enter employment or both – become Buddhist monks for several months of the year. It is not compulsory and there aren’t any life-long vows. For a limited time they practice meditation, live simply, observe celibacy and learn the discipline of a monk’s life.
Thai society, like all societies, has its faults, but I think the practice must shape the national psyche, which usually brings a calmness to much adult interaction (although perhaps that is a theory which has been very stretched recently in view of the recent anti-government fighting in Bangkok).  Nevertheless, I suspect that inter-personal relationships are much better because of the monastic background which many men have. A bit like national service is said to have done in this country, it has the potential to instil a sense of discipline of self and of respect for others.
We have a lot to say about young people learning to have respect. It seems to me children learn very well from the adult attitudes and behaviour they see, whether they be parents, teachers, footballers, politicians or celebrities. It all depends what kind of formation, young and old, there are some things we all need to learn:  control of temper, the art of waiting, the freedom to let go, the ability to deny oneself, an inner stillness.
In the Christian scheme of things these are not virtues to be cultivated out of nothing, they are echoes of the character of God and gifts of God’s Spirit, that grow in us as we grow nearer to God in Jesus.
If there is something that our society needs to recover, perhaps that the West may re-learn from the East, could it be the commitment to spiritual practice that shapes personality and character?
‘You are the potter, I am the clay, the work of your hands.’

Christian greetings,

Fr Paul.


Dear Friends and Parishioners (and so you are!),

Diane my wife and I are settling into our new home. By the time you read this letter we shall have been with you two months! It hardly seems possible. We have had a wonderful welcome into the community and look forward to being with you for some time.

I am sure we are now looking forward to warm Summer days and perhaps a holiday. It is a real joy to see sunlight come back into our gardens.

Turning our thoughts to the Church’s year, we have recently celebrated two of the major Feast Days - Pentecost (Whitsun) and Trinity. At Pentecost Christians celebrate the fresh outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon the Church bringing light and life. On Trinity Sunday Christians think about the basic teaching of the Church that God reveals himself to us as Father, Son and Holy Spirit. During the Sundays following Trinity Sunday the liturgical colour is green and Christians have traditionally thought of these Sundays as times of growth in the Faith through the work of the Holy Spirit.

During the coming months when we look for Summer sun and enjoy the light evenings perhaps we all need to think about what may be blocking the action of the Holy Spirit in our own lives and in our church communities.

Is our time of worship being pushed aside by too many worldly concerns? I know the lawn needs mowing, the shops are open and DIY and sport is important but – PLEASE – place God first and all that is right and good will follow your Sunday prayers. We all seek a deeper meaning to our everyday lives and “letting God in” is essential to a fuller life and love. More than we can ask, or imagine, is honestly realised by our presence at worship – even when we are unable to believe this to be so.

God understands that we have all sorts of distractions and pressures but surely longs for each of us to make time to draw close to his guidance and supportive love. This is important not just for ourselves but for all we seek to serve in our family, friendships and work places in the context of a world in need of those who draw close to the heart of creative love.

Sometimes we feel disappointed with worship or the response to our prayers. However, we may rest assured that we will be given strength – the Holy Spirit (the “Comforter”) – to carry us through day by day, although we may not always understand God’s action at the time.

The early Christian way of life, as we read in the Book of Acts in the Bible, is startlingly dependent on and affected by the power of the Holy Spirit at work in individuals and in the life of those early growing Christian Communities. It is striking that the Early Church looks to the power of the Holy Spirit for so many gifts: guidance, warning and empowering. There are various instances recorded of Christians realising the Holy Spirit actually prevented certain actions. Do we have sufficient awareness of the power that is working among us? Let’s go for GROWTH, but we have to be aware that if it is to be real growth, it will be as God wills and we will need to be open to the leading of the Holy Spirit, whether on our personal faith journey, or in the life of church communities.

Your friend and Priest,
Fr Paul.

Blessed be God in the Divine Praises….

Blessed be God,
Blessed be his Holy Name.

Blessed be Jesus Christ, true God and true Man.

Blessed be the name of Jesus.

Blessed be Jesus Christ in the most Holy Sacrament of the Altar.

Blessed be the Holy Spirit the Comforter.

Blessed be the Holy Spirit the Lord and Giver of Life.

Blessed be the mother of Jesus, Mary most holy.

Blessed be the name of Mary, virgin and mother.

Blessed be God in his Angels and in his Saints.

Blessed be God.”

These words may not be familiar to you. They are known as the “Divine Praises”, and are an ancient and well-loved expression, especially during the Trinity Season, of an ideal attitude towards God. In this devotion the Christian asks for nothing either for him/herself or for others, makes no mention of sin and does not thank God for anything in particular. In one sense nothing is said but, in another sense, all that needs to be said is said.

This is a devotion of faith and love and trust, which simply considers God as Father, Son, Spirit; seeing him in his Sacraments, in his mother, in his Saints and then simply saying “Blessed be God”.


It is a quiet, trustful devotion, which does not attempt to reach the heights of the “Sanctus” or “Gloria in Excelsis”, its cadences are peaceful and calming.

Its classic use is at the beginning or ending of a prayer-time or quiet time. It may also be said at any time – good or bad. Easier perhaps in a good time, but when things are hard remember Job who said: “Blessed be the name of the Lord” when he suffered one calamity after another. And the “Divine Praises” may be used simply to tell God that we love him. What is better than to be able to do that?

Why not try using the “Divine Praises” in your time with God?



Practical Matters:


1. Fr Paul may be contacted to arrange Weddings and Baptisms in the Benefice churches. It is a legal requirement that to be married in a Parish at least one of the people to be married should be resident in that Parish. If this is not the case a License from the Archbishop of Canterbury’s office will have to be obtained. Funeral services are arranged with Fr Paul, or one of the Benefice Readers, through the Undertakers. Memorial services are arranged through Fr Paul.

2. Fr Paul endeavours to make himself available to offer a ministry of listening and the ministry of absolution.

3. Please tell one of the Churchwardens/Fr Paul or one of the Readers if there is someone who is ill – either at home or in hospital – and would like someone to visit them from the church.

Fr Paul usually has FRIDAY as his free day. PGH.


Churchill, Blakedown and Broome
Weekly Village Prayer


Every Wednesday in Blakedown Church
7.30 - 8.00 p.m.

Please join us to pray for the spiritual life of our villages.
All denominations welcome.


WHEELCHAIR FOR HIRE

A high quality, modern wheelchair is now available from Blakedown Church for hire at a cost of £2 per day or £10 per week. The chair is designed to fit easily in a family car, so is ideal for outings.
Please contact Mary on 700776 to book.


NEW ADVENTURE

Each Wednesday morning, from 10.00 a.m. to 12 noon,
BLAKEDOWN CHURCH WILL BE OPEN
for anyone to pop in for a few minutes or as long as they want.
The time can be used to pray, think, be quiet or just to look around 'your church'