History


Milestone
Blakedown Recreation Rooms
Churchill Pound
Local Genealogy
Old Photographs

Milestone


We are fortunate to have an original milestone in the village. This is sited on the A456 Birmingham Road and indicates that there are 14 miles to travel before reaching Birmingham.

From the 23rd February 2006, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport have included the following structure within the Statutory List of Buildings of Architectural and/or Historic Interest, as Grade II: Milestone in Blakedown Village

"Milestone. C18 with C19 alteration. The milestone is made of sandstone with a later cast iron plate refacing it. It takes the form of a rectangular slab with a tooled surface, and rounded top. A later early C19 rectangular cast iron plate with a raised rim and lettering in relief is attached to one face. This reads "TO BIRM 14 MILES". It is believed to be one of two remaining milestones of this set, the other being in Edgbaston, Birmingham. The stone is near its original position on a grass verge, having been moved when the road, now the A456, was straightened in c1930.

HISTORY: The Birmingham to Blakedown turnpike road was made after a 1752 Act of Parliament for repairing the roads in the counties of Worcester, Stafford, Salop and Warwick and trustees were appointed for the road leading from Blakedown to Birmingham in 1753. In 1807 the milestones were ordered to be repaired which involved fitting them with cast iron plates inscribed with the distance from Birmingham.

Simon Roper-Pressdee
Conservation Officer (Historic Buildings)Wyre Forest District Council"


It can be found specifically on the first bend coming into Blakedown from Kidderminster.

The image shows a close up view of the milestone confirming the 14 miles still to travel until one reaches Birmingham City Centre - probably Colemore Row and the Cathedral - although this is just speculation.

If you know where the mile point centre is for Birmingham then let us know.



PS
It is not Villa Park or St Andrews - we know that for certain (it may be Edgbaston County Cricket Ground in the authors view though!)




Blakedown Recreation Rooms 1904-2003

As the Blakedown Recreation Rooms nears its' Centenary we thought it appropriate to give the local residents some history of the club of which we are very proud.

It was given and furnished by George Edward Wilson of Albright and Wilson who lived at Park Hall and Henry Lewis of Dudley House (ex. Roxhall) for the use and enjoyment of the Blakedown Residents as a snooker club.

In 1904 the room started with about 60 members and ended the year with a balance in hand of 10shillings and 4pence. In 1954 the room had 36 members with a balance in hand of £63.00, in 2002 the club was still very active with some 50 members and a healthy bank balance.

In 1922 a marble tablet was erected in the club by the president G.E. Wilson containing 43 names of past and present members of the Blakedown Recreation Room who served in the Great War 1914-1918. There is also an enlarged photograph of Leonard Dunsby, the one member who made the supreme sacrifice.

Mr. G.E. Wilson and Mr. H. Lewis actively supported the club until their deaths in 1927 and 1919 respectively.

At the Annual General Meeting on the 2nd May 1938 Mr. W.H. Grazebrook recorded that the rules for the election of Trustees and other officers were contained in the deed registered with the Charity Commission.

In 1954 one had an impression of refined comfort on entering the room with two billiard tables, only one of these being a full size table, the floor covered with linoleum and in the winter the warmth came from three gas fires. Since then the club has been extended, it now has three full sized tables, carpet throughout and the luxury of central heating along with other facilities. Rex Williams opened this extension in 1991 and gave a demonstration of his ability on the snooker table to the pleasure of the members.

The tradition of the club still continues and adds greatly to the amenities of the village, with four trustees and a dedicated management committee actively involved.

Anyone wishing to know more about these amenities can contact any member of the committee.

M.J. Pitt (Secretary) Tel. No. 01562 700818

24 March 2003


Churchill Pound

The term pound means an enclosure. The word has Saxon origins and is a place where straying or illegally pastured animals were confined. The Pound in Churchill is made of brick, but others are simple fences or made of local stone. A pound usually has a single entrance, sometimes with stone jams, wooden gateposts or brick pillars. Pounds came in a large variety of sizes from a few square meters, like at Churchill, to pounds over 0.5ha in size.

Once pounds went out of use, many became derelict and were demolished, but Churchill is lucky enough to have retained a pound in good condition. The following photos can be clicked for a full size image.




Old Photographs


Baches Pool March 1989
Click on the image to view
photograph full size.
Photograph courtesy of
The Express & Star
Newspaper
Baches Pool July 2009
Photograph taken from
the same position
Click on the image to view
photograph full size.
(courtesy Bob Whiston)
The Old House at Home
taken circa 1873

Click on the image to view
photograph full size.

Photograph courtesy of
The Express & Star
Newspaper

If anyone knows anything of Churchill and Blakedown's history and  would be interested in sharing their knowledge, or if anyone has any old photos, interesting anecdotes, myths or legends about the area, it would be nice to include them on this page.  Email me at Webster


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